Bibliographies: 1. Milton and Theatricality 2. Milton's Creative Influence

BIBLIOGRAPHY 1: MILTON AND THEATRICALITY (by Brendan M. Prawdzik)

General Studies

Berry, Herbert. “The Miltons and the Blackfriars Playhouse.” Modern Philology 89 (1992): 510-14.

Burbery, Timothy. Milton the Dramatist. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2007.

Coiro, Ann Baynes. “Poetic Tradition, Dramatic.” Milton in Context, ed. Stephen B. Dobranski, 58-67. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Crawforth, Dr. Hannah, “Paradise Lost in Performance” Lecture 10/9/2015 at The Place London before performance of Ben Luke’s Paradise Lost. Uploaded by Dr. Puck Fletcher. https://www.academia.edu/16621287/Paradise_Lost_in_Performance

Fallon, Stephen K. Milton’s Peculiar Grace: Self-Representation and Authority. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2007.

Fish, Stanley. How Milton Works. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2001.

Fletcher, Puck. “Paradise Lost in Performance.” Web. Public Lecture. https://www.academia.edu/16621287/Paradise_Lost_in_Performance. 12/05/17.

Goldstein, William W. “The Dramatic Milton” (PhD diss., City University of New York, 2011).

Grossman, Marshall. Authors to Themselves: Milton and the Revelation of History. Cambridge and New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Guillory, John. Poetic Authority: Spenser, Milton, and Literary History. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 1983.

Howard-Hill, T. H. “Milton and ‘The Rounded Theatre’s Pomp’.” In Of Poetry and Politics: New Essays on Milton and His World, ed. P. G. Stanwood, 95-121. Binghamton, NY: Medieval and Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1995.

Prawdzik, Brendan. “Milton on Stage: Drama, Sin, and the Holy Script” (PhD diss., UC Berkeley, 2009).

Prawdzik, Brendan,  Theatrical Milton: Politics and Poetics of the Staged Body.;  Edinburgh Critical Studies in Renaissance Culture: Edinburgh University Press; Pages: 256, 2017

———. “Naked Writhing Flesh: Rhetorical Authority, Theatrical Recursion, and Milton's Poetics of the Viewed Body.” Forthcoming in “Varietie without end”: Generative Irresolution in Milton's Poetry [title tentative], ed. Mimi Fenton and Louis Schwartz. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2012.

Ronnick, Michele Valerie. “Concerning the Dramatic Elements in Milton’s Defensiones: Theater without a Stage.” Classical and Modern Literature: A Quarterly 15 (1995): 271-79.

Rumrich, John P. Milton Unbound: Controversy and Reinterpretation. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Sauer, Elizabeth. Barbarous Dissonance and Images of Voice in Milton’s Epics. Montreal and Buffalo: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1996.

———. “Closet Drama and the Case of Tyrannical-Government Anatomized.” In The Book of the Play, ed. Marta Straznicky, 80-98. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2006.

Shore, Daniel. “'Fit Though Few': Eikonoklastes and the Rhetoric of Audience.” Milton Studies 45 (2006): 129-48.

Silver, Victoria. Imperfect Sense: The Predicament of Milton’s Irony. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.

Stackhouse, Amy D. “Sleeping with the Muse: Milton and the Gender of Authorship.” Renaissance Papers (1999): 137-46.

Thaler, Alwin, “Milton in the Theatre,” Studies in Philology, Volume XVII.3, July, 1920. See http://archive.org/stream/jstor-4171774/4171774_djvu.txt

 

Theater Culture

Andrew Dell'Antonio. Listening as Spiritual Practice in Early Modern Italy. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2011.

Gill, Catie, Ed. Theatre and Culture in Early Modern England, 1650-1737: From “Leviathan” to Licensing Act. Surrey: Ashgate, 2010.

Graves, R. B. Lighting the Shakespearean Stage, 1567-1642. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1999.

Greenblatt, Stephen. Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1980.

———. Shakespearean Negotiations: The Circulation of Social Energy in Renaissance England. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1988.

Gurr, Andrew. Playgoing in Shakespeare’s London, 3rd edition. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Heinemann, Margot. Puritanism and Theatre: Thomas Middleton and Opposition Drama under the Early Stuarts. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1980.

Howard, Jean E., The Stage and Social Struggle in Early Modern England. London and New York, NY: Routledge, 1994.

———. “Women as Spectators, Spectacles, and Paying Customers.” In Staging the Renaissance, ed. David Scott Kastan and Peter Stallybrass, 68-74. London and New York: Routledge, 1991.

Knapp, Jeffrey. Shakespeare’s Tribe: Church, Nation, and Theater in Renaissance England. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Leggatt, Alexander. Jacobean Public Theatre. London and New York, NY: Routledge, 1992.

Masten, Jeffrey. Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship, and Sexualities in Renaissance Drama. Cambridge and New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Maus, Katharine Eisaman. “‘Playhouse Flesh and Blood’: Sexual Ideology and the Restoration Actress.” ELH 46 (1979): 595-617.

Mullaney, Steven. The Place of the Stage: License, Play, and Power in Renaissance England. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

Nelson, Alan H. Early Cambridge Theaters. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

———. Records of Early English Drama. Vol. 12, Cambridge. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 1989.

Orgel, Stephen. The Illusion of Power: Political Theater in the English Renaissance. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1975.

Pollard, Tanya, Ed. Shakespeare’s Theater: A Sourcebook. Malden, MA; Oxford, UK; and Victoria, AU: Blackwell, 2004.

Potter, Lois. Secret Rites and Secret Writing: Royalist Literature, 1641-1660. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989.

Richmond, Hugh Macrae, Shakespeare's Theatre: a Dictionary of his Stage Context, London, New York: Continuum, 2002, 2005.

Skantz, P.A. Stillness in Motion in the Seventeenth-Century Theatre. London and New York: Routledge, 2003.

Straznicky, Marta. Privacy, Playreading, and Women’s Closet Drama, 1550-1700. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Tomlinson, Sophie. Women on Stage in Stuart Drama. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Wiseman, Susan. Drama and Politics in the English Civil War. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

 

Politics and Religion as “Theater”

Achinstein, Sharon. Milton and the Revolutionary Reader. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994.

———. “The Politics of Babel in the English Revolution.” In Pamphlet Wars: Prose in the English Revolution, ed. James Holstun, 14-44. London and Portland, OR: F. Cass, 1992.

———. “Samson Agonistes and the Drama of Dissent.” Milton Studies 33 (1997): 133-58.

Butler, Martin. Theatre and Crisis: 1632-1642. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1984.

Collinson, Patrick. “The Theatre Constructs Puritanism.” In The Theatrical City: Culture, Theatre and Politics in London, 1576-1649, ed. David L. Smith, Richard Strier, and David Bevington, 157-69. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Crockett, Brian. The Play of Paradox: Stage and Sermon in Renaissance England. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1955.

Degenhardt, Jane Hwang and Elizabeth Williamson, Eds. Religion and Drama in Early Modern England: The Peformance of Reigion on the Renaissance Stage. Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011.

Helgerson, Richard. "Milton Reads the King's Book: Print, Peformance, and the Making of a Bourgeois Idol." Criticisim: A Quarterly for Literature and the Arts 29 (1987): 1-25.

Lares, Jameela. Milton and the Preaching Arts. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University, 2001.

Smith, David L. and Richard Strier, Eds. In The Theatrical City: Culture, Theatre and Politics in London, 1576-1649. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Knoppers, Laura Lunger. Historicizing Milton: Spectacle, Power, and Poetry in Restoration England. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994.

Lieb, Michael. “Milton’s Of Reformation and the Dynamics of Controversy.” In Achievements of the Left Hand: Essays on the Prose of John Milton, ed. Michael Lieb and John T. Shawcross, 55-82. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1974.

Loewenstein, David. Milton and the Drama of History: Historical Vision, Iconoclasm, and the Literary Imagination. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

———. Representing Revolution in Milton and His Contemporaries: Religion, Politics, and Polemics in Radical Puritanism. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

Orgel, Stephen. The Illusion of Power: Political Theater in the English Renaissance. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1975.

———. Inigo Jones: The Theatre of the Stuart Court. Berkeley, CA and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 1973.

Poole, Kristen. “Saints Alive! Falstaff, Martin Marprelate, and the Staging of Puritanism.” Shakespeare Quarterly 46 (1995): 47-75.

Smith, David L. and Richard Strier, Eds. In The Theatrical City: Culture, Theatre and Politics in London, 1576-1649. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Tribble, Evelyn B. Margins and Marginality: The Printed Page in Early Modern England. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993.

White, Paul Whitfield. “Theater and Religious Culture.” A New History of Early English Drama, ed. John D. Knox and David Scott Kastan, 133-72. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

Williamson, Elizabeth. The Materiality of Religion in Early Modern English Drama. Surrey and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009.

Zaret, David. “Petitions and the ‘Invention’ of Public Opinion in the English Revolution.” The American Journal of Sociology 101 (1996): 1497-1555.

 

Milton and Comedy/Satire

Anselment, Raymond A. “Betwixt Jest and Earnest”: Marprelate, Milton, Marvell, Swift and the Decorum of Religious Ridicule. Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 1979.

Black, Joseph. “The Rhetoric of Reaction: The Marprelate Tracts (1588-89), Anti-Martinism, and the Uses of Print in Early Modern England.” Sixteenth Century Journal 28 (1997): 707-25.

Egan, James. “Creator-Critic: Aesthetic Subtexts in Milton’s Antiprelatical and Regicide Polemics.” Milton Studies 30 (1993): 45-66.

———. “Milton and the Marprelate Tradition.” Milton Studies 8 (1975): 103-23.

Fallon, Stephen M. “Alexander More Reads Milton: Self-Representation and Anxiety in Milton’s Defences.” Milton and the Terms of Liberty, ed. Graham Parry and Joad Raymond, 111-24. Cambridge, UK and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer, 2002.

Hill, Christopher. “Radical Prose in 17th-Century England: From Marprelate to the Levellers.” Essays in Criticism 32 (1982): 95-118.

Kranidas, Thomas. Milton and the Rhetoric of Zeal. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2005.

Limouze, Henry S. “Joseph Hall and the Prose Style of John Milton.” Milton Studies 15 (1981): 121-41.

Mendle, Michael. “Grub Street and Parliament at the Beginning of the English Revolution.” Media and Revolution: Comparative Perspectives, ed. Jeremy D. Popkin, 31-47. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1995.

Thum, Maureen. “Milton’s Diatribal Voice: The Integration and Transformation of a Generic Paradigm in Animadversions.” Milton Studies 30 (1993): 3-25.

Turner, James Grantham. “Milton among the Libertines.” Milton, Rights, and Liberties, ed. Christophe Tournu and Neil Forsyth, 447-60. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang, 2007.

 

Milton's Vacation Exercise (1628)

Campbell, Gordon. “The Satire on Aristotelian Logic in Milton’s ‘Vacation Exercise’.” English Language Notes 15 (1977): 106-10.

Freidberg, Elizabeth Ann Perryman. “Certain Small Entertainments: The Texts and Contexts of Thomas Randolph’s Poems and College Entertainments.” PhD diss, Cambridge University, 1994.

Hale, John K. “Milton Plays the Fool: The Christ’s College Salting, 1628.” Classical and Modern Literature: A Quarterly 20.3 (Spring, 2000): 51-70.

———. Milton’s Cambridge Latin: Performing in the Genres, 1625-1632. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

Milton, John. Vacation Exercise [titled “Milton’s Salting (Editio Princeps)”]. In Milton’s Cambridge Latin: Performing in the Genres: 1625-1632, ed. and trans. John K. Hale, 243-93. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

Radzinowicz, Mary Ann. “‘To Play in the Socratic Manner’: Oxymoron in Milton’s ‘At a Vacation Exercise in the College’.” University of Hartford Studies in Literature 17.3 (1985): 1-11.

Richek, Roslyn. “Thomas Randolph’s ‘Salting’ (1627), its Text, and John Milton’s Sixth Prolusion as Another ‘Salting’.” English Literary Renaissance 12 (1982): 102-31.

Urban, David. “The Lady of Christ’s College Himself a ‘Lady Wise and Pure’: Parabolic Self-Reference in John Milton’s ‘Sonnet IX’.” Milton Studies 47 (2008): 1-23.

 

Milton's Courtly Entertainments (Arcades, Comus)

Bradburn, Elizabeth. “Bodily Metaphor and Moral Agency in A Masque: A Cognitive Approach.” Milton Studies 43 (2004): 19-34.

Breasted, Barbara. “Comus and the Castlehaven Scandal.” Milton Studies 3 (1971): 201-24.

Broaddus, James W. “‘Gums of Glutinous Heat’ in Milton’s Mask and Spenser’s Faerie Queene.” Milton Quarterly 37 (2003): 205-14.

Brown, Cedric C. John Milton’s Aristocratic Entertainments. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1985.

———. “The Komos in Milton.” John Donne Journal 5 (1986): 235-66.

———. “Presidential Travels and Instructive Augury in Milton’s Ludlow Masque.” Milton Quarterly 21.4 (December, 1987): 1-12.

Coiro, Ann Baynes. “Anonymous Milton, or, A Maske Masked.” ELH 71 (2004): 609-29.

Corthell, Ronald. “Go Ask Alice: Daughter, Patron, and Poet in A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle.” Milton Studies 44 (2005): 111-28.

Creaser, John. “Milton’s Comus: The Irrelevance of the Castlehaven Scandal.” Milton Quarterly 21.4 (December, 1987): 24-34.

Cunnar, Eugene R. “Milton, The Shepherd of Hermas, and the Writing of a Puritan Masque.” Milton Studies 23 (1987): 33-52.

Demaray, John G. Milton and the Masque Tradition: The Early Poems, Arcades, and Comus. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1968.

———. “The Temple of the Mind: Cosmic Iconography in Milton’s A Mask.” Milton Quarterly 21.4 (December, 1987): 59-76.

Dubrow, Heather. “The Masquing of Genre in Comus.” Milton Studies 44 (2005): 62-83.

Escobedo, Andrew and Beth Quitslund. “Sage and Serious: Milton’s Chaste Original.” Milton Quarterly 37 (2003): 179-83.

Fletcher, Angus. The Transcendental Masque: An Essay on Milton’s Comus. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1971.

Gillum, Michael. “Gumms of Glutenous Heat.” Milton Quarterly 44 (2010): 47-51.

Graham, Jean E. “Virgin Ears: Silence, Deafness, and Chastity in Milton’s Maske.” Milton Studies 36 (1998): 1-17.

Greteman, Blaine. “'Perplex't Paths': Youth and Authority in Milton's Mask.” Renaissance Quarterly 64 (2009): 410-43.

Halpern, Richard. “Puritanism and Maenadism in A Mask.” In Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe, ed. Margaret W. Ferguson, Maureen Quilligan, and Nancy J. Vickers, 88-105. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1986.

Hoxby, Blair. “The Wisdom of Their Feet: Meaningful Dance in Milton and the Stuart Masque.” English Literary Renaissance 37 (2007): 74-99.

Hunt, Maurice. “Managing Spenser, Managing Shakespeare in Comus.” Neophilologus 88 (2004): 315-33.

Hunter, William B. “The Liturgical Context of Comus.” English Language Notes 10 (1972): 11-15.

Kellet, Katherine R. “The Lady's Voice: Poetic Collaboration in Milton's Mask.” Milton Studies 50 (2009): 1-19.

Kinsella, John. Comus, a Masque by John Milton: A Reply. Souvenir Programme, ed. David Parry. Christ’s College Cambridge: the Marlowe Society, 2008. Web. http://milton.christs.cam.ac.uk/comusprogramme.pdf

Lewalski, Barbara K. “Milton’s Comus and the Politics of Masquing.” In The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, ed. David Bevington and Peter Holbrook, 296-320. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Lindley, David. “The Politics of Music in the Masque.” In The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, ed. David Bevington and Peter Holbrook, 273-95. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Marcus, Leah S. “The Earl of Bridgewater’s Legal Life: Notes toward a Political Reading of Comus.” Milton Quarterly 21.4 (December, 1987): 13-21.

———. The Politics of Mirth: Jonson, Herrick, Milton, Marvell and the Defense of Old Holiday Pastimes. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1986.

Martin, Catherine Gimelli. “The Non-Puritan Ethics, Metaphysics, and Aesthetics of Milton’s Spenserian Masque.” Milton Quarterly 37 (2003): 213-44.

McGuire, Maryann Cale. Milton’s Puritan Masque. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1983.

Milton, John. A Maske: The Earlier Versions, ed. S.E. Sprott. Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 1973.

Morris, Jane Burden, William Blake's Milton: "Milton's Comus and other Poems" Web. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6cbWAuVaRk

Norbrook, David. “The Reformation of the Masque.” In The Court Masque, ed. David Lindley, 94-110. Manchester, UK and Dover, NH, USA: Manchester University Press, 1984.

Orgel, Stephen. “The Case for Comus.” Representations 81 (2003): 33-45.

Ortiz, Joseph M. “‘The Reforming of the Reformation’: Theatrical, Ovidian, and Musical Figuration in Milton’s Mask.” Milton Studies 44 (2005): 84-110.

Piggott, Jan. “Milton’s Comus: from Text to Stage, the Fine Arts, and Book-illustration, c. 1750-1850.”British Art Journal [forthcoming, with 22 illustrations, in 2014].

Prawdzik, Brendan. “'Look on Me': Theater, Gender and Poetic Identity Formation in Milton's Maske.” Forthcoming in Studies in Philology 110 (2013).

Richmond, Hugh M., “Comus” in The Christian Revolutionary: John Milton, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1974, pp. 65-78.

Rogers, John. “The Enclosure of Virginity: The Poetics of Sexual Abstinence in the English Revolution.” In Enclosure Acts: Sexuality, Property, and Culture in Early Modern England, ed. Richard Burt and John Michael, 229-50. Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 1994.

Shuger, Deborah K. “‘Gums of Glutinous Heat’ and the Stream of Consciousness: Theology in Milton’s Maske.” Representations 60 (1997): 1-21.

Shullenberger, William. “Girl, Interrupted: Spenserian Bondage and release in Milton’s Ludlow Mask.” Milton Quarterly 37 (2003): 184-204.

———. The Lady in the Labyrinth: Milton's “Comus” as Initiation. Madison, NY: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2008.

Steggle, Matthew. “‘The Tragical Part’: Milton’s Masque and Euripides.” Classical and Modern Literature 20 (1999): 18-36.

Stevens, Paul. “Magic Structures: Comus and the Illusions of Fancy.” Milton Quarterly 17 (1983): 84-89.

 

The Court Masque

Bevington, David M. and Peter Holbrook, intro. to The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, ed. David M. Bevington and Peter Holbrook, 1-20. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Britland, Karen. Drama at the Courts of Queen Henrietta Maria. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Butler, Martin. “Courtly Negotiations.” In The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque, ed. David M. Bevington and Peter Holbrook, 20-40. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

———. “A Provincial Masque of Comus, 1636.” Renaissance Drama 17 (1986): 149-74.

Orgel, Stephen. The Illusion of Power: Political Theater in the English Renaissance. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1975.

———. Inigo Jones: The Theatre of the Stuart Court. Berkeley, CA and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 1973.

 

Paradise Lost

Black, James. “The Return to Pandemonium: Interlude and Antimasque in Paradise Lost.” Wascana Review 9 (1974): 139-98.

Bradburn, Elizabeth. “Theatrical Wonder, Amazement, and the Construction of Spiritual Agency in Paradise Lost.” Comparative Drama 40 (2006): 77-98.

Demaray, John G. Milton’s Theatrical Epic: The Invention and Design of “Paradise Lost.” Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980.

Fish, Stanley. Surprised by Sin: The Reader in “Paradise Lost,” 2nd edition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Fletcher, Puck. “Paradise Lost in Performance.” Web. Public Lecture. https://www.academia.edu/16621287/Paradise_Lost_in_Performance. 12/05/17.

Goodman, Kevis. “‘Wasted Labor’? Milton’s Eve, the Poet’s Work, and the Challenge of Sympathy.” ELH 64 (1997): 415-46.

Greenberg, Lynne A. “Paradise Enclosed and the Feme Covert.” In Milton and the Grounds of Contention, ed. Mark R. Kelley, Michael Lieb, and John T. Shawcross, 150-73. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2003.

Hanford, James Holly. “The Dramatic Element in Paradise Lost.” Studies in Philology 14 (1927): 178-95.

Ide, Richard S. “On the Uses of Elizabethan Drama: The Revaluation of Epic in Paradise Lost.” Milton Studies 17 (1983): 121-40.

Kietzman, Mary Jo. “The Fall into Conversation with Eve: Discursive Difference in Paradise Lost.” Criticism 39 (1997): 55-88.

Kilgour, Maggie. “‘Thy Perfect Image Viewing’: Poetic Creation and Ovid’s Narcissus in Paradise Lost.” Studies in Philology 102 (2005): 307-39.

Lewalski, Barbara K. “Paradise Lost” and the Rhetoric of Literary Forms. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985.

Lieb, Michael. “Milton’s ‘Dramatick Constitutions’: The Celestial Dialogue in Paradise Lost, Book III.” Milton Studies 23 (1987): 215-40.

Liebert, Elisabeth. “Rendering ‘More Equal’: Eve’s Changing Discourse in Paradise Lost.” Milton Quarterly 37 (2003): 152-165.

Nyquist, Mary. “Reading the Fall: Discourse and Drama in Paradise Lost.” English Literary Renaissance 14 (1984): 199-229.

Richmond, Hugh M., adapt. John Milton’s Drama of “Paradise Lost.” New York: Peter Lang, 1991.

———. “Paradise Lost: Performance as Criticism.” Milton Quarterly 22 (1988): 17-20.

———. “Paradise Lost as Oral Epic,” in Approaches to Teaching Milton's Paradise Lost, Second Edition. Editor: Peter C. Herman. New York: Modern Languages Association, 2012, pp. 192-6.

Steadman, John. Epic and Tragic Structure in Paradise Lost. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1976.

Stevens, Paul. Imagination and the Presence of Shakespeare in “Paradise Lost”. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985.

Stevenson, Kay Gillilland, and Margaret Sears, “Paradise Lost in Short: Smith, Stillingfleet, and the Transformation of Epic,” Farleigh Dickinson University Press/Associated University Presses, London, 1998.

Sugimura, N. K. “Matter of Glorious Trial”: Spiritual an Material Substance in “Paradise Lost”. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009.

 

Pre-Paradise Lost Biblical Dramas

Andreini, Giambattista. L’Adamo. In The Celestial Cycle: The Theme of “Paradise Lost” in World Literature, ed. and trans. Watson Kirkconnell, 227-67. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1952.

Beza, Theodore. Abraham Sacrifant. Published as A Tragedie of Abraham’s Sacrifice, trans. Arthur Golding. London: Vautroullier, 1577.

Buchanan, George. George Buchanan Tragedies, ed. P. Sharratt and P. G. Walsh. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1983.

Campbell, Lily B. Divine Poetry and Drama in Sixteenth-Century England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; Berkeley: University of California Press, 1961.

Grotius, Hugo. Adamus Exul. In The Celestial Cycle: The Theme of “Paradise Lost” in World Literature, ed. and trans. Watson Kirkconnell, 96-220. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1952.

Hanford, James Holly. “Appendix B: Notes on Milton’s Paradise Lost and Other Biblical Scenarios.” In Complete Prose Works of John Milton, ed. Don M. Wolfe et al., 8.586-96. 8 vols. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1953-82.

Salandra, Serafino della. Adamo Caduto. In The Celestial Cycle: The Theme of “Paradise Lost” in World Literature, ed. and trans. Watson Kirkconnell, 290-349. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1952.

Steadman, John. “Appendix A: Milton’s Outlines for Tragedies.” In Complete Prose Works of John Milton, ed. Don M. Wolfe et al., 8.539-85. 8 vols. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1953-82.

 

Paradise Regained

Goldsmith, Stephen. “The Muting of Satan: Language and Redemption in Paradise Regained.” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900 27 (1987): 125-40.

Revard. Stella P., “ Satan in Paradise Regained: The Quest for Identity” in DuRocher, Richard J. and Thickstun, Margaret Olofson. Milton's Rival Hermeneutics: "Reason Is But Choosing". Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2012. pp. 205-224 . Project MUSE. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. .

Samuels, Peggy. “Labor in the Chambers: Paradise Regained and the Discourse of Quiet.” Milton Studies 36 (1998): 153-76.

Shoulson, Jeffrey S. “Milton and Enthusiasm: Radical Religion and the Poetics of Paradise Regained.” Milton Studies 47 (2008): 219-57.

 

Samson Agonistes

Andrews, John F. “‘Dearly Bought Revenge’: Samson Agonistes, Hamlet, and Elizabethan Revenge Tragedy.” Milton Studies 13 (1979): 81-107.

Arthos, John. “Milton and the Passions: A Study of Samson Agonistes.” Modern Philology 69 (1972): 209-21.

Bennett, Joan S. Reviving Liberty: Radical Christian Humanism in Milton’s Great Poems. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1989.

Burns, Norman T. “‘Then Stood up Phinehas’: Milton’s Antinomianism, and Samson’s.” Milton Studies 33 (1997): 27-46.

Coiro, Ann Baynes. “Fable and Old Song: Samson Agonistes and the Idea of a Poetic Career.” Milton Studies 36 (1998): 123-52.

Fish, Stanley. “Spectacle and Evidence in Samson Agonistes.” Critical Inquiry 15 (1989): 556-86.

Flesch, William. “Reading, Seeing, and Acting in Samson Agonistes.” In Critical Essays on John Milton, ed. Christopher Kendrick, 131-46. New York: G.K. Hall; London: Prentice Hall International, 1995.

Grossman, Marshall. “Textual Ethics: Reading Transference in Samson Agonistes.” In Reading Renaissance Ethics, ed. Marshall Grossman, 85-103. New York, NY and Abington: Routledge, 2007.

Garganigo, Alex. “Samson's Cords: Imposing Oaths in Samson Agonistes.” Milton Studies 50 (2009): 125-49.

Ide, Richard S. “The Renaissance Dramatic Heritage of Samson Agonistes.” In Soundings of Things Done: Essays in Early Modern Literature in Honor of S. K. Heninger, Jr., ed. Peter E. Medine and Joseph Wittreich, 152-77. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press; London and Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 1997.

Iwanisziw, Susan B. “Conscience and the Disobedient Female Consort in the Closet Dramas of John Milton and Elizabeth Cary.” Elizabeth Cary, ed. Karen Raber, 513-26. Surrey: Ashgate, 2009.

Kerman, Sandra. “George Buchanan and the Genre of Samson Agonistes.” Language and Style 19 (1986): 21-25.

Kerrigan, William. “The Irrational Coherence of Samson Agonistes.” Milton Studies 22 (1986): 217-32.

Kezar, Dennis. “Samson’s Death by Theater and Milton’s Art of Dying.” ELH 66 (1999): 295-336.

———. “Shakespeare’s Rome in Milton’s Gaza? Echoes and Presences in Samson Agonistes.” English Language Notes 34.4 (June, 1997): 1-10.

Leo, Russ. “Milton's Aristotelian Experiments: Tragedy, Lustratio, and 'Secret Refreshings' in Samson Agonistes.” Milton Studies 52 (2011): 221-52.

Lewalski, Barbara K. “Milton’s Samson and the ‘New Acquist of True [Political] Experience.” Milton Studies 24 (1989): 233-51.

Liebert, Elisabeth. “Samson Agonistes and Spiritual Autobiography.” Parergon 22.2 (July, 2005): 132-57.

Loewenstein, David.. “The Revenge of the Saint: Radical Religion and Politics in Samson Agonistes (1671).” Milton Studies 33 (1997): 159-80.

Low, Anthony. The Blaze of Noon: A Reading of “Samson Agonistes”. New York: Columbia University Press, 1974.

———. “Milton’s Samson and the Stage, with Implications for Dating the Play.” Huntington Library Quarterly 40 (1977): 313-24.

Nardo, Anna K. “‘Sung and Proverb’d for a Fool’: Samson as Fool and Trickster,” Mosaic 22.1 (Winter, 1989): 1-16.

Neelakanta, Vanita. “Theatrum Mundi and Milton's Theater of the Blind in Samson Agonistes.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 11.1 (Spring-Summer, 2011): 30-58.

Radzinowicz, Mary Ann. “The Distinctive Tragedy of Samson Agonistes.” Milton Studies 17 (1983): 249-80.

———. Toward “Samson Agonistes”: The Growth of Milton’s Mind. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978.

Richmond, Hugh M., “Samson Agonistes: The Existential Act” in The Christian Revolutionary: John Milton, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1974, pp. 176-92.

Rosenberg, D. M. “Samson Agonistes: ‘Proverb’d for a Fool’.” The Centennial Review, 32 (1988): 65-78.

Rudrum, Alan. “Milton Scholarship and the Agon over Samson Agonistes.” Huntington Library Quarterly 65 (2002): 465-88.

Samuel, Irene. “Samson Agonistes as Tragedy.” In Calm of Mind: Tercentenary Essays of “Paradise Regained” and “Samson Agonistes” in Honor of John S. Diekhoff, ed. Joseph A. Wittreich, James G. Taaffe, and Jane Cerny, 235-57. Cleveland: Press of Case Western Reserve University, 1971.

Sauer, Elizabeth. “The Politics of Performance in the Inner Theater: Samson Agonistes as Closet Drama.” In Milton and Heresy, ed. Stephen B. Dobranski and John P. Rumrich, 199-215. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Shawcross, John T. The Uncertain World of Samson Agonistes. Cambridge, UK and Rochester, NY: D. S. Brewer, 2001.

Sypniewski, Holly M. and Anne MacMaster, “Double Motivation and the Ambiguity of 'Ungodly Deeds': Euripides's Medea and Milton's Samson Agonistes.” Milton Quarterly 44 (2010): 145-67.

Wittreich, Joseph. Interpreting “Samson Agonistes.” Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986.

———. Shifting Contexts: Reinterpreting “Samson Agonistes.” Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2002.

Wood, Derek N. C. “Catharsis and ‘Passion Spent’: Samson Agonistes and Some Problems with Aristotle.” Milton Quarterly 26 (1992): 1-9.

———. Exiled from Light: Divine Law, Morality, and Violence in Milton’s “Samson Agonistes.” Toronto and Buffalo: University of Toronto Press, 2001.

 

Milton in Performance

Burbery, Timothy J. “Intended for the Stage? Samson Agonistes in Performance.” Milton Quarterly 38 (2004): 35-49.

Goldstein, Bill. “Samson Regained: A Play in Perpetual World Premier.” Uncircumscribed Mind: Reading Milton Deeply, ed. Charles Durham and Kristin Pruitt, 307-29. Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 2008.

Davies, H. Neville. “Samson Agonistes in Performance: Musical Addenda.” Milton Quarterly 39 (2005): 180-81.

Martina, Enna. “The Sources and Traditions of Milton’s L’Allegro and Il Penseroso: A New Approach.” English Studies: A Journal of English Language and Literature 92 (2011):138-173.

Richmond, Hugh M., adapt. John Milton’s Drama of “Paradise Lost.” New York: Peter Lang, 1991.

———. “Paradise Lost: Performance as Criticism.” Milton Quarterly 22 (1988): 17-20.

 

This BIBLIOGRAPHY 1 was developed by Brendan M. Prawdzik. Comments are welcomed at brendanprawdzik@gmail.com.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 2: PREFACE FOR A PLANNED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON MILTON'S CREATIVE INFLUENCE (by Hugh Macrae Richmond)

This Bibliography is concerned primarily with recent investigations of creative artists' response to Milton's oeuvre, as covered by John T. Shawcross in his magisterial "John Milton and Influence: Presence in Literature, History and Culture." For example, in 1677 John Dryden described Milton as the poet of the sublime but went on to compose the less magnificent The State of Innocence and the Fall of Man: an Opera (1677) which still shows Milton’s direct influence. Even his satirical mock epic, Absolom and Achitophel, reflects Miltonic precedents in its biblical theme. As for Europe, there was an early, partial translation of Paradise Lost into German by Theodore Haak, and based on that a standard verse translation by Ernest Gottlieb von Berge. A subsequent prose translation by Johann Jakob Bodmer was popular and influenced Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock. The German-language Milton tradition returned to England in the illustrations of the artist Henry Fuseli, whose work led the way for other illustrators such as Gustave Doré in France and John Martin in England. These illustrate the effect of Milton on the Fine Arts, internet access to which we are concerned to identify here.

Though he never set any of Paradise Lost to music, Handel had great musical affinities for Milton’s poetry. His opera Samson follows the script closely at certain points and elaborates it skillfully in ironically festive music for the Philistines. Arias from Handel's setting of Samson are a regular source for modern concert programming. We have identified examples of this process in our video gallery, with comments in this bibliography. There is also a libretto based on Paradise Lost by Benjamin Stillingfleet with music by John Christopher Smith the Younger which was first performed in 1760, with a printed version that year (re-edited by Kay Stevenson and Margaret Sears in 1998: see below). Many other musical versions of Milton exist, and recently Handel’s unique empathy for Milton is also seen in his settings for "L'Allegro" and "Il Penseroso" as used by Mark Morris for his dance group production based on Handell’s setting of the poems. Discussions of these appear here and also in our video gallery.

Many 18th century authors revered Milton's poetry and prose: Alexander Pope, Joseph Addison, Thomas Newton, and Samuel Johnson, elevating him thereby as a model for practicing poets. His blank-verse paragraphs generally, and combination of blank and rhymed verse with paragraphic effect in Lycidas, offered an English verse-rhythm distinct from formal English metre. Late 18th c. poets (from Gray on) appreciated "the composition of Milton's harmony: “how he loved to vary his pauses, his measures, and his feet, which gives that enchanting air of freedom and wilderness to his versification." Milton's liberty extended to vocabulary, with Latinate neologisms, and obsolete words no longer understood. In 1740, Francis Peck identified examples of Milton's "old" words (now popular again). The “Miltonian dialect” as it was called, was used by Pope in his Homer translation, and Gray and Collins were criticized for “obsolete words out of Spenser and Milton”. The language of Thomson's The Seasons, and Castle of Indolence had the same tone as Paradise Lost. Following Milton, English poetry from Pope to John Keats exhibited a steadily increasing attention to the connotative, the imaginative and poetic, value of words. This sequence is increasingly explored in depth by recent critics (see 18th c. below).

William Blake considered Milton the major English poet. Blake, placing Edmund Spenser as Milton's precursor, saw himself as Milton's poetical son. In his "Milton a Poem," Blake uses Milton as a character. Blake began "Milton a Poem" (the title page is dated 1804, but Blake worked on it until 1808). The preface includes the poem "And did those feet in ancient time", which became the words for the anthem "Jerusalem."Of course, Blake was inspired by Milton's verse to create the spectacular series of images which have become iconic, greatly influencing how Milton is perceived by many modern radicals. We list convenient points of web access to such visual materials and commentaries.

The Romantic poets also valued and reincarnated Milton's poetry as when William Wordsworth began his sonnet "London, 1802" with "Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour." He also modelled The Prelude, as blank verse epic, on the strong autobiographical elements in Paradise Lost, as markedly stressed in our production of Paradise Lost at U.C.B. (see our video gallery). However, despite innumerable Miltonic echoes throughout his poetry, John Keats wrote that "Miltonic verse cannot be written but in an artful or rather artist's humour" and felt that Paradise Lost was a "beautiful and grand curiosity," concluding that his own attempt at Miltonic epic, Hyperion, was unsatisfactory because it had too many "Miltonic inversions." By contrast, in The Madwoman in the Attic, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar note that Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein is, for many critics, "one of the key 'Romantic' readings of Paradise Lost" - reinforcing a major shift in the canon.

Victorians such as George Eliot (see below: Anna K. Nardo, George Eliot's Dialogue with John Milton) were inspired by Milton's poetry and biography, but later some attempts were made to discourage awareness of the Miltonic precedents for modern poets. T. S. Eliot believed that "of no other poet is it so difficult to consider the poetry simply as poetry, without our theological and political dispositions... making unlawful entry." There was much hostile 20th-century criticism similar to that by T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound, though F. R. Leavis, in The Common Pursuit, responded to Eliot’s claim that "the study of Milton could be of no help: it was only a hindrance," by arguing, "As if it were a matter of deciding not to study Milton! The problem, rather, was to escape from an influence that was so difficult to escape from because it was unrecognized, belonging, as it did, to the climate of the habitual and 'natural'." Harold Bloom, in The Anxiety of Influence, wrote that "Milton is the central problem in any theory and history of poetic influence in English." However, a change in modern attitudes to Milton was invited by critics such as Stanley Fish in Surprised by Sin and Hugh Richmond in The Christian Revolutionary, who argued strongly for Milton's contemporary relevance. Such shifts in perspective are also reflected in developments such as that the title of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy comes from "His dark materials to create more worlds"in Paradise Lost (II. 915). Pullman wanted a version of Milton's poem for teenagers, and spoke of Milton as "our greatest public poet". It is this shift in perspective our bibliography will stress.

One bold example of Milton’s modern intercultural impact is Krzysztof Penderecki’s opera called Paradise Lost in two acts (divided into 42 scenes), with an English libretto by Christopher Fry, based on Milton’s epic. Penderecki called it a sacra rappresentazione, written on commission for the 1976 USA Bicentennial. The first performance was on 11/29/1978, at the Lyric Opera of Chicago. The same production was given at La Scala, Milan in 1979. Other productions were mounted in Stuttgart in April 1979 (touring to Munich and elsewhere); another in 2001 in Münster; and another in Breslau by Opera Wroclawska for the season 2009-10. For full details and illustrations see P. G. Stanwood, 'Paradise Lost, Epic and Opera', Early Modern Literary Studies 15.3 (2011). For a recorded performance of Act I Part 1 (51 minutes) see YouTube. The three further segments are also on YouTube.

Modern public awareness of Milton has also been powerfully furthered by the fact that in 2006 there were favorably-reviewed stage performances of a three-hour version of Paradise Lost at the Oxford Playhouse (U.K.). This movement towards the stage has precedent in the performance of a script based on direct speeches in Paradise Lost, later published by Peter Lang as John Milton’s Drama of ‘Paradise Lost’- available elsewhere on this site and on YouTube. For several years concert recitations of Paradise Lost have also been successfully presented in England and elsewhere by David Burns, based on recitation of complete books chosen from the full text. There are also numerous public marathon readings of the epic at many academic institutions, as illustrated in our blog.

A striking example of the way Milton can be successfully reintroduced to modern culture at all levels is provided by the work of Terrance Lindall. Lindall's book Paradise Lost Illustrated has been compared to other Milton illustrators including William Blake (see 21st c. heading below). According to New York University professor Karen Karbiener, many students prefer Lindall's version, which appeared in Heavy Metal magazine and has a popular following among young people. Professor Karbiener gave a lecture at the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center in 2004 on "Milton's Satan and his impact on countercultural artistic movements from William Blake to the Beat poets." Lindall’s art for Paradise Lost appears on the cover of Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton from Random House (2008). Holt Rinehart & Winston used another Lindall Paradise Lost image in a 2009 high school textbook. Oxford University's major exhibit "Citizen Milton” used one of Lindall's artworks for Paradise Lost from the Nii Foundation collection.

The new perspective on Milton as an inspiration for modern creativity is reflected in the comments on Lindall's work by current Milton scholars. Critical response to Lindall’s “Paradise Lost Series " includes William Kerrigan, former president of the Milton Society of America remarked "Radical artist and nonconformist Terrance Lindall has channeled Milton’s spirit into a modern context, in a provocative series of illustrations to Paradise Lost. His visual celebration of Milton reveals his remarkable affinity for the radical English poet, and his ability to create a fitting tribute to Milton’s enduring influence in the arts." Professor Thomas Clayton of the University of Minnesota wrote: "Clearly avoiding the view that Pop imagery is inherently a sign of trauma, Terry Lindall employs the cartoon elements of style with a charming and often unnerving directness and simplicity, frequently aimed at causing a trauma all his own. This is particularly the case with his illustrations of Milton’s Paradise Lost, with which he reaches a hyper-intensified and nearly hysterical verve." Mark Daniel Cohen, critic for Review Magazine and NY Arts Magazine wrote: "Since I was a teenager back in 1982, I’ve considered Terrance Lindall one of the globe’s greatest artists. My particular favorite is his intense adaptation of Paradise Lost, which never fails to instill a pervasive dread in my mind."

Lindall created the world’s first "Grand Paradise Lost Costume Ball", which opened the largest festival in the world honoring John Milton’s 400th birthday. The festival took place between September 27 and November 2, 2008 at the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center (WAH Center), exhibiting over 70 contemporary artists from around the world and includind writers, poets, composers and performers. The exhibit included Terrance Lindall’s original illustrations for Paradise Lost. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg issued a proclamation recognizing the hard work and labor of love in creating this Milton Festival, which Random House's website confirmed as the "largest birthday tribute to Milton in the world." WAH Center founder Wendy Woon, the Edward John Noble Foundation Deputy Director for Education of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, said: “The exhibit and programs promise to be a diverse collection of multiple perspectives and strategies that should engage the audience you hope to reach." During his year-long celebration of John Milton's 400th birthday (from December 8, 2008), Terrance Lindall created "The Paradise Lost Gold Illuminated Scroll," a scroll that reads from right to left like a Torah, now in the Milton collection at the Yuko Nii Foundation. Such is the celebratory climate of modern awareness of Milton of which we hope to explore the origins and documentation here. This Provisional Preface and the following Bibliography In Progress have been prepared by Hugh Richmond. Please send comments to hmr@berkeley.edu

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON MILTON'S CREATIVE INFLUENCE

[This Bibliography is in progress and is not intended as definitive.]

GENERAL

Adams, W. Davenport. “Comus: a History of the Masque.” [from A Dictionary of the Drama. W. Davenport Adams. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1904.] http://www.theatrehistory.com/british/comus.html

Bloom, Harold. The Anxiety of Influence: A Theory of Poetry. Oxford University Press US, 1997. Burbery, Timothy J. “Intended for the Stage? Samson Agonistes in Performance.” Milton Quarterly. 38.1 (March, 2004), 35-49.

Burbery, Timothy J.. “Milton the Dramatist.” Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2007.

Crawforth, Dr. Hannah, “Paradise Lost in Performance” Lecture 10/9/2015 at The Place London before performance of Ben Luke’s Paradise Lost. Uploaded by Dr. Puck Fletcher. https://www.academia.edu/16621287/Paradise_Lost_in_Performance

Guibbory, Achsah. "Milton and English Poetry" in A Companion to Milton. Ed. Thomas Corns. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2003.

Good, John Walter. “Studies in the Milton Tradition.” Urbana: University of Illinois Studies in Languages and Literature, Volume I, nos. 3 and 4, 1915. Havens, R. D.. “The Influence of Milton on English Poetry, Cambridge, Mass., 1922.

Klawitter, George, The Iconography of Paradise Lost, http://myweb.stedwards.edu/georgek/milton/icon.htm

Labriola, Albert C. and Edward Sichi, eds. Milton’s Legacy in the Arts.” University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1988.

Loewenson, Leo. “E.G. von Berge, translator of Milton and Russian interpreter 1649-1722.” Slavonic and East European Review, 34.83 (June, 1956) 281-91.

Piggott, Jan. “Milton's Comus: from Text to Stage, the Fine Arts, and Book-illustration, c. 1750-1850.” [22 illustrations] British Art Journal XV.2 (Winter 2014-15), 18-32.

Pointon, Marcia R. Milton and English Art. Manchester: Manchester U.P., 1970.

Prawdzik, Brendan,  Theatrical Milton: Politics and Poetics of the Staged Body.;  Edinburgh Critical Studies in Renaissance Culture: Edinburgh University Press; Pages: 256, 2017

Richmond, Hugh M. The Christian Revolutionary: John Milton, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1974.

Shawcross, John T. “John Milton and His Spanish and Portuguese Presence” Milton Quarterly, 32.2 (May 1998), 41-52.

Shawcross, John T. “John Milton and Influence: Presence in Literature, History, and Culture,” Duquesne University Press, 1991.

Siemens, R.G. "Milton's Works and Life: Select Studies and Resources." Early Modern Literary Studies, iEMLS Postprint . Originally published in Dennis Danielson (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Milton. 2nd ed. Cambridge, 1999. Pp. 268-90.

Stevenson, Kay Gilliland. "Reading Milton, 1674-1800" in A Companion to Milton. Ed. Thomas Corns. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2003.

Thaler, Alwin, “Milton in the Theatre,” Studies in Philology, Volume XVII.3, July, 1920. See http://archive.org/stream/jstor-4171774/4171774_djvu.txt

Von Maltzahn, Nicholas. "Milton's readers" in The Cambridge Companion to Milton. Ed. Dennis Danielson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Waterhouse, Gilbert. “The Literary Relations of England and Germany in the 17th Century.” Cambridge University Press, 1914. Chapter XIII "Milton in Germany" 136-42

17th CENTURY

Berge, E. G. von, translator. Das Verlustigte Paradeis aus Johan Miltons Zeit seiner Blindheit in Englischer Sprache abgefassten unvergleichen Gedicht in Unser gemein Teutsch übergetragen und verlegt Durch E. G. BV. B. Zerbst, 1682.

Churchill, George B. “The Relation of Dryden's ‘State of Innocence’ to Milton's ‘Paradise Lost’ and Wycherley's ‘Plain Dealer’: An Inquiry into Dates” Modern Philology , 4. 2 (Oct., 1906), 381-388 University of Chicago Press, URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/432735

Dodds, Lara. “Poetic Authority in Manuscript and Print: the Case of Milton's Paradise Lost and Dryden's The State of Innocence and Fall of Man “ in A Manuscript Miscellany (Summer 2005 Institute directed by Steven W. May) http://www.folger.edu/html/folger_institute/mm/EssayLD.html

Knoppers, Laura Lunger. “Historicizing Milton: Spectacle, Power, and Poetry in Restoration England.” Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994.

Loewenson, Leo. “E.G. von Berge, translator of Milton and Russian interpreter 1649-1722.” Slavonic and East European Review, 34.83 (June, 1956) 281-91.

Lowenstein, David. “Representing Revolution in Milton and His Contemporaries: Religion, Politics, and Polemics in Radical Puritanism.” Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

18th CENTURY

Arne, Thomas. “The Music in the Masque of Comus. Written by Milton. As it Was Perform'd at the Theatre-Royal in Drury-Lane...” Opera Prima, the first edition of the printed score of The Musick in the Masque of Comus, [1740]

Blake, William: See 19th C.

Handel, G. F., “Samson, an Oratorio, As it is Performed at the Theatre-Royal in Covent Garden from the Samson Agonistes of Milton. The Music composes by George Frederick Handel, Esq; London: Printed by J. Hardy, by Assignment of Mr. R. Tonson, and Sold by T. Lowndes in Fleet-Street [Price One Shilling]” (see google.com/books)

Haydn, Joseph: The Creation (Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798, considered Haydn’s masterpiece. It depicts the creation as described in Genesis and Paradise Lost. It is scored for soprano, tenor and bass soloists representing the Archangels Gabriel, Uriel, and Raphael, with chorus and a symphonic orchestra.

Milton, John. “Comus: a Mask” Adapted for Theatrical Representation, as Performed First at the Theatre-Royal, Covent-Garden, in the Year 1744. Bibliobazaar, 2010. http://www.ebay.com/ctg/Comus-Mask-John-Milton-Adapted-Theatrical-Repres...

Morris, Jane Burden, William Blake's Milton: "Milton's Comus and other Poems" Web. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6cbWAuVaRk Ogborne, John, and Richard Westfall. “Comus: Sabrina Releasing the Lady from her Spell.” John Ogborne & Richard Westall. For John Boydell. London, 1795.

Reid, David. ”Thomson's Poetry of Reverie and Milton.” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, 43.3 (Summer, 2003), 667-682.

Roberts, Les. “Samson” [review of recorded performance in 1966 by The Symphony of Harmony and Invention for Collins Classics; Harry Christophers, conductor] http://gfhandel.org/reviews/hwv057coro.htm

Rooke, Deborah. From Wild Man to War Hero: the Story of Samson.” Handel’s Israelite Oratorio Libretti: Sacred Drama and Biblical Exegesis. Oxford: Oxford University Press 98-120.

Sensabaugh, George. F. “Milton in Early America.” Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1964.

Shawcross, John T. “John Milton: The Critical Heritage. Volume 2 1732-1801.” Routledge, 2013.

Stevenson, Kay Gillilland, and Margaret Sears, “’Paradise Lost’ in Short: Smith, Stillingfleet, and the Transformation of Epic,” Farleigh Dickinson University Press/Associated University Presses, London, 1998

Van Anglen, K. P. “Milton: Literary Reception and Cultural Authority in the Early Republic.” Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993.

19th CENTURY

Blake, William, “Illustrations to Milton's "Paradise Lost" The Thomas Set, 1807 (Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery. The Thomas Set, 1807 (Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery Illustrations to Milton's "Paradise Lost", The Thomas Set, 1807 (Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery): electronic edition

Blake, William. “Illustrations to Paradise Regained.” Blaske Archive. Illustrations to Milton's "Paradise Regained", c. 1816-20 (Fitzwilliam Museum): electronic edition

Blake, William. “Milton: a Poem.” 1811. Blake Archive. http://www.blakearchive.org/exist/blake/archive/work.xq?workid=milton&ja... William Blake's Milton: "Milton's Comus and other Poems" Morris, Jane Burden, Web. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6cbWAuVaRk

Behrendt, Stephen C. “The Moment of Explosion: Blake and the Illustration of Milton.” London: University of Nebraska Press, 1983.

Brisman, Leslie. “Milton's Poetry of Choice and Its Romantic Heirs.” Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1973.

Burson, Luree. “The Influence of Milton on Wordsworth’s Poetry.” M. A. Thesis, N. Texas College,1950.http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc130234/m2/1/high_res_d/n...

Chung, Chulmin. “Milton and the Romantic Sonnet Revival. “Inha University. http://hompi.sogang.ac.kr/anthony/mesak/mes182/Chung.pdf Dickson, Lloyd. "Against the Wiles of the Devil: Carlotta Petrina's Christocentric Illustrations of Paradise Lost." Milton Studies 25 (1989), 161-195.

Doré, Gustave, “’Paradise Lost’: Illustrations.” Dan Short, ed. http://www.danshort.com/pl/ Dunbar, Alice. “Wordsworth’s Use of Milton’s Description of the Building of Pandemonium.” Modern Language Notes, 24.4 (April, 1909) 124-5.

Harral, Thomas. “2. Poetry and Visions of the River Severn” in Picturesque Views of the Severn, 1824. Shropshire Archives.

Howe, Sarah, “Illustrating Paradise Lost,” in Darkness Visible Christ’s College Cambridge. http://darknessvisible.christs.cam.ac.uk/about_us/sarah_howe.html

Jarvis, Robin. “Wordsworth, Milton and the Theory of Poetic Relations.” Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991. Jones, Frederick. "Shelley and Milton," Studies in Philology, 49.3 (1952), 488-519.

Klawitter George. "John Martin's Revolution and Grandeur: A New Direction for Milton's Early Illustrators," Explorations in Renaissance Culture (1998) 91-117:http://myweb.stedwards.edu/georgek/milton/icon.htm

Martin, John, The Paradise Lost of Milton with illustrations, designed and engraved by John Martin, London: Septimus Prowett, 1827.

McCormack, Colin. “Wordsworth and Milton: The Prelude and Paradise Lost.” Providence College:12/19/2010. http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&co...

McNulty, John Bard. “Milton's Influence on Wordsworth's Early Sonnets. PMLA 62. 3 (Sep., 1947), 745-751.

Milton, John. “Samson Agonistes,” directed by Harcourt Williams, Court Theatre, July 8, I913. Cumberland. Nardo, Anna K. George Eliot's Dialogue with John Milton. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2003.

Newmeyer, Edna. “Paradise Preserved or Paradise Regained: Milton and Wordsworth on the Scale of Love.” In Milton and the Romantics, Nineteenth Century Contexts, 2.1 (1976), 11-15.

Sugimura, N. K. “'Old Man' Milton and the Making of Tennyson's Idylls of the King” Essay 8. in “Tennyson Among the Poets: Bicentenary Essays,” ed. Robert Douglas Fairhurst & Seamus Perry Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Wade, Philip. “Shelley and the Miltonic Element in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein” Milton and the Romantics, 2 (December 1976), 23-25.

Werner, Bette Charlene. “Blake's Vision of the Poetry of Milton: Illustrations to Six Poems.” Bucknell University Press, 1986. Williams, Meg Harris, “Inspiration in Milton and Keats.” London and Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1982.

20th. CENTURY

Downing, David C., “Planets in Peril: A Critical Study of C. S. Lewis's Ransom Trilogy.” University of Massachusetts Press, 1992.

Dulac. Edmund. “Comus: a Masque.” [Five colored prints] Heritage Press, 1954.

Frost, Laurie. “Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials - The Definitive Guide.” Scholastic, 2007.

Hodges, Horace Jeffery. The Bottomless Bottle of Beer, Illustrated by Terrance Lindall. Brooklyn: Williamsburg Circle of International Arts and Letters, 2013.

Hull, Helen Meg Pearson, and Erin Sadlack, eds. “A Performance History of Comus.” University of Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, 2000. http://www.mith.umd.edu/comus/index.htm

Lawes, Henry. “Five Songs for John Milton's Masque: Comus.” U. C. Berkeley, 1986. YouTube, Jan 5, 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iS9cXWfVZXk

Lawrence, John, “Milton and Pullman” in Darkness Visible, Chrit’s College, Cambridge. http://darknessvisible.christs.cam.ac.uk/imitation.html Lewis, C. S. “Perelandra.” 1943, UK, The Bodley Head, 1943.

Lewis, C. S. “Perelandra” [review by Mr. Bultitude] St Anne’s on the Hill, 20 August 2011. http://stannesonthehill.wordpress.com/2011/08/20/perelandra-by-cs-lewis/

Lindall, Terrance R. (1983). John Milton's Paradise Lost: Synopsized and with Illustrations.

Lindall, Terrance R. Milton's Paradise Lost - The Lindall Quarto - YouTube

Milton, John. “Comus.” Performed at Christ’s College, Cambridge, 1908; 2008 (19, 20, 21 June, and in Hall on 22, 24 June). http://milton.christs.cam.ac.uk/comus.htm

Milton, John. “Comus A Masque: Souvenir Programme Performed by the Ashridge Players in the Gardens of Ashridge House.” Music by Henry Lawes [1595-1662] . Produced by Arthur Bryant Assisted by Winifred Thorne [Starring Reginald Hoskins, Kirk Glazebrook, Tord Lidell, Arthur Bryant, Rosemary Corry, George Brander, Hugh Sellon] Published by Performance Programme Dated July 18th and 19th, 1930 http://www.abebooks.com/Comus-Masque-John-Milton-Souvenir-Programme/9943...

Milton, John. “Paradise Lost” (2 hrs.), two live public performances by the English Department in April 1985 in Fife Room,Wheeler Hall, U.C. Berkeley. See full recording at http://milytonrevealed.berkeley.edu/

Morris, Mark. “L’Allegro, Il Penseroso ed Il Moderato.” http://markmorrisdancegroup.org/allegro Penderecki, Krzysztof, an opera called Paradise Lost in two acts (divided into 42 scenes), with an English libretto by Christopher Fry, commissioned for the USA 1976 Centennial, first performed on 11/29/1978, at the Lyric Opera of Chicago.

Powell, William. “Samson Agonistes.”[ at the Victoria and Albert Museum, 1900: first production] See Robert Speaight William Poel and the Elizabethan Revival (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1954), 152–57. Speaight cites a review by C. E. Montague, in Dramatic Values (London: Methuen, 1911), 225–31.

Pullman, Philip. “His Dark Materials Trilogy” 1995-2000. [published first as “Northern Lights.”: The Golden Compass (in North America} 1995; “The Subtle Knife” 1997; and “The Amber Spyglass” 2000]. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, distributed by Random House, ©1995, etc. Rackham, Arthur. “Comus [54 illustrations].” William Heinemann (London) and Doubleday Page & Co (New York), 1921.

Richmond, Hugh Macrae, ed. “John Milton’s Drama of ‘Paradise Lost’.” New York: Peter Lang, 1992.

-------------, "’Paradise Lost’: Performance as Criticism," Milton Quarterly, 22.1 March, 1988), pp.17-20.

Scherer, Ulrike. "‘Dream not of Other Worlds’: C.S. Lewis, Philip Pullman and the Ghost of Milton.” (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago, 2011. http://otago.ourarchive.ac.nz/handle/10523/1775

Schwartz, Sanford. “C. S. Lewis on the Final Frontier — Science and the Supernatural in the Space Trilogy.” Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Taylor, Don, "Paradise Restored," 1972 BBC Omnibus documentary biography of John Milton broadcast by BBC One in its Omnibus series, Sunday 2 Jan. 1972, Season 6, Episode 1, starring John Neville, Polly James and Anne Stallybrass. The Times wrote: “Mr Taylor gave us a searing study of the giant in chains… The thing was splendidly written and movingly performed.” (Leonard Buckley, ‘Omnibus’, The Times, 3 January 1972, p. 8.) The Guardian called it “a triumph for imagination.” (Peter Fiddick, ‘Everybody’s Revolution on Television’, The Guardian, 3 January 1972, p. 8.)

Wittreich, Joseph. “Interpreting ‘Samson Agonistes’.” Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986.

21st CENTURY

Croggon, Alison. “Review: Comus [at Christ’s College Cambridge, June, 2008].” Theatre Notes, June 25, 2008. http://theatrenotes.blogspot.com/2008/06/review-comus.html

Davies, H. Neville. “’Samson Agonistes’ in Performance: Musical Addenda.” Milton Quarterly 39 (2005): 180-81.

Farr, David, adapter. John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” produced at the Old Vic, Bristol, 3- 21 February 2004. Gardner, Lyn, “Literary Topiary.” Guardian (U.K.) http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2004/feb/05/theatre

Fletcher, Puck. “Paradise Lost in Performance.” Web. Public Lecture. https://www.academia.edu/16621287/Paradise_Lost_in_Performance. 12/05/17.

Goldstein, Bill. “Samson Regained: A Play in Perpetual World Premier.” Uncircumscribed Mind: Reading Milton Deeply, ed. Charles Durham and Kristin Pruitt, 307-29. Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 2008.

Goosey, Veronica. “Performing Closet Drama: Milton’s ‘Samson Agonistes’ as a staged reading by Red Bull Theater, October 14 2013.” Oct. 16, 2013. http://nyurrg.org/2013/10/16/performing-closet-drama-miltons-samson-agon...

Hodges, Horace Jefferey. The Bottomless Bottle of Beer. Kindle Edition. Terrance Lindall, illustrator. New York: The Williamsburg Circle, Jan. 15 2013. http://www.amazon.ca/Bottomless-Bottle-Horace-Jeffery-Hodges-ebook/dp/B0...

Kaufman, Sarah. “Mark Morris Dance Group: ‘L’Allegro.” Washington Post, 18 January 2012. http://www.washingtonpost.com/gog/performing-arts/mark-morris-dance-grou...

Kinsella, John. Comus, a Masque by John Milton: A Reply. Souvenir Programme, ed. David Parry. Christ’s College Cambridge: the Marlowe Society, 2008. Web. http://milton.christs.cam.ac.uk/comusprogramme.pdf

Levine, Debra. “Mark Morris Dance Group performs ‘L’Allegro’ with L.A. Opera.” Los Angeles Times. May 6, 2011. “http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2011/05/dance-review-mark...

Lindall, Terrance: “Elephant Folio for ‘Paradise Lost’.” Yuko Nii Foundation, https://sites.google.com/site/terrancelindallsparadiselost/home/elephant...

Maxwell, Glyn [words] & Luke Bedford [music], “Seven Angels” premiere: Birmingham 17 June at Birmingham Contemporary Music Group. Birmingham Contemporary Music Group tours: Cardiff, Glasgow, Brighton, Oxford [Playhouse], the Linbury [Royal Opera House, London, 12th July], the Latitude Festival [Suffolk]. http://www.theoperagroup.co.uk/?p=24

Maxwell, Glyn [words] & Luke Bedford [music], Seven Angels, Oxford Playhouse show details. http://www.oxfordplayhouse.com/archive/show.aspx?eventid=1898 Maxwell, Glyn, “Seven Angels” [Libretto] London: Oberon Books 2011 http://books.google.com/books?id=sg90RJ5FvAsC&pg=PA1&lpg=PA1&dq=Seven+An...

Meaney, Aleksis, John Milton’s “Paradise Lost as a Theatrical Production,” University of Tampere, M.A, Thesis, 2005, http://tampub.uta.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/92684/gradu00557.pdf?sequence=1

Milton, John. “Samson Agonistes.” On 14 December 2008 BBC Radio 3 broadcast a production for the 400th anniversary of Milton's birth, adapted for radio and directed by John Tydeman. Milton, John. “Samson Agonistes.” On 11/ 20/2011, the play was performed in the CripSlam series, Victory Gardens, Chicago and on 11/17/ 2011 at the University of Notre Dame, directed by Todd Bauer, with drama students from the University of Notre Dame.

Ozorio, Anne. “Seven Angels” Glyn Maxwell, [words] & Luke Bedford [music]. Opera Today 6/10/2011 http://www.operatoday.com/content/2011/06/luke_bedford_se.php

Power, Ben, adapter. John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” produced at the Royal and Derngate Theatre, Northampton, 30 January to 14 February 2004. http://www.kent.ac.uk/library/specialcollections/theatre/r.php/38811/sho...

Suellentrop, Chris, NY Times Arts, 1/28/15, C6: “Enticing All to See the Bigger Picture” [Discusses "The Talos Principle" a digital video game based on Milton’s" Paradise Lost"] Wood, Peter, Paradise Lost, Bristol Old Vic, 2004 [review], British Theatre Guide, http://www.britishtheatreguide.info/reviews/paradiselost-rev